Page 14 - VigoreChicago1

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Although his works in Pointillism are masterful, his first love
is modernism. It originally made sense to study George Seurat
and his Pointillism as it is considered the starting point of all
modern art. If you ask Rubin he will define him-self as a Fauve,
the name of recognition self used by Henri Matisse and George
Braque. Meeting Salvador Dali during a visit to the university
led to an amazing friendship during the last decade and a half
of Dali’s life. Salvador had been a fan of Pointillism since his
teenage years. He is the reason that Ladies of the Canyon is also
a surreal work. After the Art Institute exhibition they became as
close a grandfather and grandson. Marc stayed with the Dali’s
during several exhibition trips to Europe. Salvador painted in
and invented styles which are not seen as Surrealism but
Salvador told Marc that all true modern art is Surrealism as
true abstraction is the effort of altering reality.
Salvador encouraged Marc to continue inventing new
modernist styles. It is Salvador Dali who named one of these
established inventions as Surreal Cubism.
The following year, 1977, Marc Rubin made the greatest
contribution to Fine Art since Georges Seurat invented and
defined Pointillism in 1873. He defined and created the first
work in his invention, Synchronism.
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Chicago River View 1996
42 x 42 inches, Pop Cubism
The Birth Of Seth
60 x 60 inches, Synchronism
Synchronism was in practice but never as a genre. Rubin’s
Self Portrait 1969, combination of Cubism and Fauvism.
Coral, Under the Sea 1996
42x48 inches, Surreal Cubism
In 1976 upon Marc’s return from a one man exhibition in
Europe he was commissioned to paint a city-scape of Chicago.
When asked to create a new style for the painting his response
was the invention of Pop Cubism. Two of his many Pop Cubist
city scapes were requested in poster form by The City of
Chicago Cultural Center Stores. They are also sold at Posters
Plus on Michigan Avenue across the street from The Art
Institute of Chicago.