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cause the ecosystem is so healthy. Sharks, despite how many people still misunder-stand them, play an extremely important role in the marine food web. They are top predators that are in charge of keeping the populations of other reef-going animals in check, as well as ridding the ecosystem of sick or injured creatures that are a detri-ment to the overall health and success of coral reefs. Sharks are what we call “key-stone” or “indicator” species because they are a barometer for reef health, so when there are no sharks, it’s clear that the reefs are in trouble. In that case, Cuba’s reefs are about as far from “in trou-ble” as possible. A diver can easily see three species of sharks in one morning, and then con-tinue the day to photo-graph crocodiles, sea turtles, tarpons, Goliath groupers, jellyfish, eels, and undoubtedly more sharks.

Cuba, both topside and underwater, is a photogra-pher’s paradise. I hope that in the coming years we can maintain a balance between relaxed regulations and sustainable tourism so as to preserve this place in its cur-rent beauty for the foresee-able future. Please enjoy some of the photos I captured while in Havana and diving

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