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walls are a history project, covered with a cen-tury’s worth of layered paints while many of the furniture pieces are bit more modern, coming from 1960’s Amsterdam. Finkleman explained the his-tory of Thalia Hall and his vision for the re-estab-lishment. “Thalia Hall was a family venue. It held community events and was a public hall.” Finkle-man described that he would like to use the space for more community events like farmer’s markets. Thalia Hall was once prominent for immigrants at the start of the 20th century, it begs the question, what changed? Finkleman explained that,

“The Bohemians moved out [of Pilsen at the turn of the century] because of jobs and the economy. The area changed and was gentrifrified.” So, it ap-pears that the Bohemians dealt with the same sit-uation that the Latin community in Pilsen faces today. Perhaps Pilsen is an example of a natural city cycle.

The Bohemian origins of Pilsen have never left. The most prominent influence of the Bohemians can be seen in the architecture. But the origins of Pilsen, named after one of the largest cities in the Czech Republic are largely lost in the present Mexican image. Dusek’s may be bringing back some of Pilsen’s essence, but at what price? Ac-

cording to Chicago radio, WBEZ, the Mexican population has dropped from over 37 thousand residents to nearly 25 thousand in the past two decades. While residents like Tortolero are uncon-vinced that the Latin layout of the neighborhood will be lost, some are more concerned about the displacement of people of particular cultures. Posters stating, “White Hipsters Get out of Pilsen!”could once be found on walls and littered on sidewalks. The poster displays two cartoon white young adults, sipping coffee, wearing boots, thick glasses while representing thrift stores and wearing UIC sweatshirts. While this poster is a satirical representation of the current changes in Pilsen, the question that arises is, ‘who is entitled to live where’?

Although the revival of Thalia hall is a sort of re-union with the origins of the Pilsen neighborhood, it is still at odds with the Mexican community that has been established for the past half century. Mexican immigrants began migrating rapidly into the neighborhood during the 1960’s with the ex-pansion of the University of Illinois at Chicago, and the immigrants have for the most part main-tained their hold since then. Tortolero, who has been working in the neighborhood for the past 30

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